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If you build it, they will use it for sexual gratification. Or at least that's what Twitch is learning.

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Original author: 
Jon Brodkin


Can Google's QUIC be faster than Mega Man's nemesis, Quick Man?

Josh Miller

Google, as is its wont, is always trying to make the World Wide Web go faster. To that end, Google in 2009 unveiled SPDY, a networking protocol that reduces latency and is now being built into HTTP 2.0. SPDY is now supported by Chrome, Firefox, Opera, and the upcoming Internet Explorer 11.

But SPDY isn't enough. Yesterday, Google released a boatload of information about its next protocol, one that could reshape how the Web routes traffic. QUIC—standing for Quick UDP Internet Connections—was created to reduce the number of round trips data makes as it traverses the Internet in order to load stuff into your browser.

Although it is still in its early stages, Google is going to start testing the protocol on a "small percentage" of Chrome users who use the development or canary versions of the browser—the experimental versions that often contain features not stable enough for everyone. QUIC has been built into these test versions of Chrome and into Google's servers. The client and server implementations are open source, just as Chromium is.

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Original author: 
Todd Hoff

The paper MegaPipe: A New Programming Interface for Scalable Network I/O (video, slides) hits the common theme that if you want to go faster you need a better car design, not just a better driver. So that's why the authors started with a clean-slate and designed a network API from the ground up with support for concurrent I/O, a requirement for achieving high performance while scaling to large numbers of connections per thread, multiple cores, etc.  What they created is MegaPipe, "a new network programming API for message-oriented workloads to avoid the performance issues of BSD Socket API."

The result: MegaPipe outperforms baseline Linux between 29% (for long connections) and 582% (for short connections). MegaPipe improves the performance of a modified version of memcached between 15% and 320%. For a workload based on real-world HTTP traces, MegaPipe boosts the throughput of nginx by 75%.

What's this most excellent and interesting paper about?

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Original author: 
Sean Gallagher


A frame of Timelapse's view of the growth of Las Vegas, Nevada.

Google, USGS

This story has been updated with additional information and corrections provided by Google after the interview.

In May, Google unveiled Earth Engine, a set of technologies and services that combine Google's existing global mapping capabilities with decades of historical satellite data from both NASA and the US Geological Survey (USGS). One of the first products emerging from Earth Engine is Timelapse—a Web-based view of changes on the Earth's surface over the past three decades, published in collaboration with Time magazine.

The "Global Timelapse" images are also viewable through the Earth Engine site, which allows you to pan and zoom to any location on the planet and watch 30 years of change, thanks to 66 million streaming video tiles. The result is "an incontrovertible description of what's happened on our planet due to urban growth, climate change, et cetera," said Google Vice President of Research and Special Initiatives Alfred Spector.

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Original author: 
Germain Lussier

Just Like Being There header

Briefly: You may remember last year’s South by Southwest film festival when I wrote a blog about appearing in a documentary. That documentary, Just Like Being There directed by Scout Shannon, is now available on Netflix Instant. It’s a carefree journey through the world of limited edition gig posters, told through the music of festivals like SXSW and more.

Eventually, it gets to Mondo and the current movie poster craze, where you can my embarrassing contribution, but if you’re bored this weekend and looking for a flick, there are many worse ways you can spend 90 minutes. Here’s the direct link.

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A shot of Unity 4's new Mecanim animation interface.

AAA developers with deep pockets are no doubt looking forward to the many gorgeous upgrades available in the upcoming Unreal Engine 4. But smaller independent developers will probably be more excited about the new features for Unity's just announced Unity Engine 4.

The new version of Unity fully integrates new animation tools from Mecanim, a Canadian company that Unity acquired last year. This brings skill from experienced animators who have worked with major publishers including EA and Ubisoft. Besides improving computational efficiency and increasing Unity's limit on simultaneously animated characters from dozens to "hundreds" at once, Unity President Dave Helgason stressed that the Mecanim system makes animation much simpler for developers.

"Things that would normally take several hours or even days to do—taking the animation data, making sure it fits the character, timing the motion extracts and making sure it all loops correctly—now that's all automatic so it's literally minutes... you can do so much more with so much less," Helgason told Ars. Users will also be able to buy canned animations from the Unity Asset Store, dropping fully animated characters into their projects unedited, or diving in deep to play with the underlying blend trees and state machines if they want.

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