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Hey! You're looking at the front page of recorder.sayforward.com which is a temporary storage place for articles I didn't read/evaluate yet. I also use this platform to prepare new content to post sayforward.com where audio/video/image material is hosted completely on my server. On the recorder instead, media is loaded from external sources, so don't get mad if some of them don't work anymore.

Please note that the content posted here is explicitly intended to help me remember certain things, i.e. it is not intended to entertain you in any way (although you certainly will find stuff that fulfills this criteria).

Now: Happy Browsing!

Gamification: Rules, Magic Circles and other Pitfalls - by Andrzej Marczewski:

It might not be a game, but you still need rules and to understand how people might behave - not how you want them to behave. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Free To Play, Valve’s Dota Documentary, Is Out And Free:

Valve tend to approach every project with a similar ethos, regardless of whether they’re making a game, some software, an operating system or, it turns out, a movie. Their first attempt at the latter, a documentary about professional Dota 2 players called Free To Play, spent much of last year being beta tested in front […] via Rock, Paper, Shotgun

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Deconstructing Free To Play - by Ara Shirinian:

This talk analyzes the dynamics of some of the most popular F2P games, especially with regards to learning, engagement, and psychological effects, especially long term sustainability and unintended side effects. Delivered at Phoenix IGDA. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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A few thoughts about Replayability - by Gera Hmurov:

Should we need the replayability in large scale games as a feature? via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Why Do We Tolerate Pay To Win In Real Life Competitions But Not Games? - by Chip Sineni:

We tolerate “Pay To Win” strategies in real life competitions but complain about it in games. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Office Offal: Corporate Lifestyle Simulator:

Dawn Of The Dead contained some brilliant social commentary. The zombies were in a shopping mall, you see, which made the audience think about the herd-like cannibalistic nature of modern consumerism. Genius! If the film had been set in a school it would have contained brilliant social commentary about the mindless clones created by the […] via Rock, Paper, Shotgun

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Selling on the Unity Asset Store - by Ernest Mallett:

While working on our main project we decided to turn to Unity’s Asset Store for a little extra funding.Since there seems to be very little info for emerging asset developers I decided I’d write a little a little on our experiences with the Asset Store. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Invasion of the mind-altering parasites: This year, science writer Ed Yong went from being a noted critic of the TED conference science coverage to being part of the TED conference science coverage.

    



via Boing Boing

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Peter Molyneux: Working For Microsoft Is Like Taking Antidepressants: SmartAboutThings (1951032) writes “Peter Molyneux is one of the most famous personalities in the history of gaming, especially recognized for having created God games Dungeon Keeper, Populous, Black & White, but also the Fable series. After creating the Fable series, Molyneux announced in March 2012 that he will be leaving Lionhead and Microsoft to start another company – 22Cans. During a recent interview, the former Microsoft employee has shared some interesting details regarding the time when he was working over at Redmond. Here’s the excerpt from his interview: ‘I left Microsoft because I think when you have the ability to be a creative person, you have to take that seriously, and you have to push yourself. And pushing yourself is a lot easier to do if you’re in a life raft that has a big hole in the side, and that’s what I think indie development is. You’re paddling desperately to get where you want to go to, but you’re also bailing out. Whereas if you’re in a big supertanker of safety, which Microsoft was, then that safety is like an anesthetic. It’s like taking antidepressants. The world just feels too comfortable.’” Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




via Slashdot

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Game Developers Conference '14: The Experimental Gameplay Workshop:

There are a few regular, unmissable sessions at the annual Game Developers Conference in San Francisco, sessions that have achieved Legendary status, a catalogue of extreme and memorable moments.

    



via Boing Boing

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Pine Tree Has Largest Genome Ever Sequenced: sciencehabit (1205606) writes “Using a single pollinated pine seed, researchers have sequenced the entire genome of the loblolly pine tree—and it’s a doozy. The tree’s genome is largest yet sequenced: 22.18 billion base pairs, more than seven times longer than the human genome. The team found that 82% of the genome was made up of duplicated segments, compared with just 25% in humans. The researchers also identified genes responsible for important traits such as disease resistance, wood formation, and stress response.” Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




via Slashdot

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The History of Robot Anime:

The Japanese government commissioned a report on the history of Japanese robot animation. Yes, the government. My government’s robot studies are undoubtedly focused on stuff like killer Predator and Reaper drones. Japan’s? Astro Boy, Tranzor Z, and Voltron. More power… via AltJapan

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A tool to optimise our memory of past experiences:

I wanted to share this project, which was developed as a research method to discover how reflexivity affects our interpretation of a performance and our self-perception. Inspired by wearable methods of tracking and biometric quantification in order to optimise interpretation and self-reflection, this project speculates how our biometric personal data may be collected in order to optimise our memory of past experiences.

It was a finishing project at CIID in 2013.

http://ift.tt/1gkIzDc

via SpaceCollective posts

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Context-aware web design can take your business to the next level:

Responsive web design isn’t a new concept.  Broken down into simple terms, it’s the practice of refactoring a page’s layout based on the size of the screen used to interface with it. As a result the same web page might look … Continued

The post Context-aware web design can take your business to the next level appeared first on Big Spaceship.

via Big Spaceship

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The Latest in Web Font Trends:

Ever since @font-face was introduced, our web font choices have grown tremendously each year. Web font trend data can help us make sense of all those new choices—and give insight into which typefaces are working well on the web, and which might even be overused. Let’s explore where we can find data on what’s popular now, and how we can use that information.

Google Fonts

The most popular Google fonts can be sorted by total views. The drastic difference in pageviews of Open Sans is quite impressive: it’s viewed more than three times as often as any other font. Here are Google’s dominant three for the last 30 days:

  1. Open Sans
  2. Roboto
  3. Oswald

Fonts.com

The Fonts.com blog updates monthly with its list of most-popular fonts. Trade Gothic was its top family for February 2014, moving up from the number two spot a year ago. Over the last year, Avenir Next has grown in popularity, while Din Next has declined. Fonts.com’s top three in February were:

  1. Trade Gothic
  2. Avenir Next
  3. Neue Helvetica

Font Squirrel

Filtering by “Webfont” and sorting by “Popularity” will yield us Font Squirrel’s most popular for @font-face embedding. Its top three:

  1. GoodDog
  2. Quicksand
  3. Open Sans

Typekit

Typekit doesn’t share the most popular fonts by view, but by most favorited. When it released the favoriting functionality in 2011, Adelle was the most adored, but has since dropped down a spot. Futura PT was number two and is now number five. Typekit’s most favorited three are:

  1. Museo Sans
  2. Adelle
  3. Proxima Nova

Font Deck

Want to look at the most popular serif, sans-serif, or script? You can do that at Font Deck, along with sorting all font families by popularity. Its top three overall:

  1. Proxima Nova
  2. Apercu
  3. Bliss

FontSpring

All fonts on FontSpring have web licenses available. Whether its list of popular fonts takes that into consideration is a bit unclear, but we see some common font friends that we’ve seen before. Its bestselling in the last 30 days:

  1. Proxima Nova
  2. Museo Sans
  3. Museo

Webtype

Webtype has a nice advanced filtering section, including an “intended size” filter for finding your perfect small or large type sizes. Changing the default filtering from “Most Recent” to “Popularity” gives us these leaders:

  1. Gill Sans
  2. Benton Sans
  3. Ibis

There are plenty of other choices for serving or downloading web fonts from, but you can see with a bit of digging, we can learn a lot about what’s been working well for others.

Using the data

How can we put this information to work? Here are some examples from my own experience.

I worked on a website in which using any paid third-party services was prohibited, but the team was hesitant to use free web fonts because appearing professional was critical. Looking at how popular the sans-serif fonts Open Sans, PT Sans, and Source Sans were on Google Fonts gave us the confidence to use one of those in production.

Another project started with the use of Futura, a font that is common to these popular lists and had been used in a few of my recent projects. I wanted to try something new, so I used those same lists for inspiration and tried out some of the fonts a little further down in the popularity numbers, and it helped refresh the design.

There’s no one way to look at this data, though. Maybe the top fonts are popular because they have fabulous font hinting, or maybe because they’ve been used on influential sites. It’s up to you to interpret the trends in the context of your project’s needs and goals—but watching them can help inform your next font choices.

via A List Apart: The Full Feed

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Archist City: Iconic Modern Art Reimagined as Architecture:

Works from 27 iconic modern artists are translated into architecture to make up one of the most colorful fictional cities every imagined. You can almost via WebUrbanist

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Stanford Bioengineer Develops a 50-cent Paper Microscope: An anonymous reader writes “Scope: A Stanford bioengineer has developed an ultra-low-cost print-and-fold microscope and is now showing others how to make one themselves. The 50-cent lightweight, paper ‘Foldscope’ — which ‘can be assembled in minutes, [and] includes no mechanical moving parts’ — was designed to aid disease diagnosis in developing regions.” The paper describing the design is on arXiv, and a video demoing the microscope is attached below. Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




via Slashdot

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Cosmos not doing it for you? Maybe try I F*cking Love Science:

A Facebook phenomenon has found its way to the small screen. via Ars Technica

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Game Tech: How BioShock Infinite's Lighting Works: An anonymous reader writes “The Principal Graphics Programmer for BioShock Infinite has put up a post about how the game’s lighting was developed. We don’t usually get this kind of look into the creation of AAA game releases, but the studio shut down recently, so ex-employees are more willing to explain. The game uses a hybrid lighting system: direct lighting is dynamic, indirect uses lightmaps, shadows are a mix. ‘Dynamic lighting was handled primarily with a deferred lighting/light-pre pass renderer. This met our goals of high contrast/high saturation — direct lighting baked into lightmaps tends to be flat, mostly because the specular approximations available were fairly limited.’ It’s interesting how much detail goes into something you don’t really think about when you’re playing through the game. ‘We came up with a system that supported baked shadows but put a fixed upper bound on the storage required for baked shadows. The key observation was that if two lights do not overlap in 3D space, they will never overlap in texture space. We made a graph of lights and their overlaps. Lights were the vertices in the graph and the edges were present if two lights’ falloff shapes overlapped in 3D space. We could then use this graph to do a vertex coloring to assign one of four shadow channels (R,G,B,A) to each light. Overlapping lights would be placed in different channels, but lights which did not overlap could reuse the same channel. This allowed us to pack a theoretically infinite number of lights in a single baked shadow texture as long as the graph was 4-colorable.’” Share on Google+

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The WhatsApp Architecture Facebook Bought For $19 Billion:

Rick Reed in an upcoming talk in March titled That’s ‘Billion’ with a ‘B’: Scaling to the next level at WhatsApp reveals some eye popping WhatsApp stats:

What has hundreds of nodes, thousands of cores, hundreds of terabytes of RAM, and hopes to serve the billions of smartphones that will soon be a reality around the globe? The Erlang/FreeBSD-based server infrastructure at WhatsApp. We’ve faced many challenges in meeting the ever-growing demand for our messaging services, but as we continue to push the envelope on size (>8000 cores) and speed (>70M Erlang messages per second) of our serving system.

But since we don’t have that talk yet, let’s take a look at a talk Rick Reed gave two years ago on WhatsApp: Scaling to Millions of Simultaneous Connections.

Having built a high performance messaging bus in C++ while at Yahoo, Rick Reed is not new to the world of high scalability architectures. The founders are also ex-Yahoo guys with not a little experience scaling systems. So WhatsApp comes by their scaling prowess honestly. And since they have a Big Hairy Audacious of Goal of being on every smartphone in the world, which could be as many as 5 billion phones in a few years, they’ll need to make the most of that experience.

Before we get to the facts, let’s digress for a moment on this absolutely fascinating conundrum: How can WhatsApp possibly be worth $19 billion to Facebook?

As a programmer if you ask me if WhatsApp is worth that much I’ll answer expletive no! It’s just sending stuff over a network. Get real. But I’m also the guy that thought we don’t need blogging platforms because how hard is it to remote login to your own server, edit the index.html file with vi, then write your post in HTML? It has taken quite a while for me to realize it’s not the code stupid, it’s getting all those users to love and use your product that is the hard part. You can’t buy love

What is it that makes WhatsApp so valuable? The technology? Ignore all those people who say they could write WhatsApp in a week with PHP. That’s simply not true. It is as we’ll see pretty cool technology. But certainly Facebook has sufficient chops to build WhatsApp if they wished.

Let’s look at features. We know WhatsApp is a no gimmicks (no ads, no gimmicks, no games) product with loyal users from across the world. It offers free texting in a cruel world where SMS charges can be abusive. As a sheltered American it has surprised me the most to see how many real people use WhatsApp to really stay in touch with family and friends. So when you get on WhatsApp it’s likely people you know are already on it, since everyone has a phone, which mitigates the empty social network problem. It is aggressively cross platform so everyone you know can use it and it will just work. It “just works” is a phrase often used. It is full featured (shared locations, video, audio, pictures, push-to-talk, voice-messages and photos, read receipt, group-chats, send messages via WiFi, and all can be done regardless of whether the recipient is online or not). It handles the display of native languages well. And using your cell number as identity and your contacts list as a social graph is diabolically simple. There’s no email verification, username and password, and no credit card number required. So it just works.

All impressive, but that can’t be worth $19 billion. Other products can compete on features.

Google wanted it is a possible reason. It’s a threat. It’s for the .99 cents a user. Facebook is just desperate. It’s for your phone book. It’s for the meta-data (even though WhatsApp keeps none).

It’s for the 450 million active users, with a user based growing at one million users a day, with a potential for a billion users. Facebook needs WhatApp for its next billion users. Certainly that must be part if it. And a cost of about $40 a user doesn’t seem unreasonable, especially with the bulk paid out in stock.  Facebook acquired Instagram for about $30 per user. A Twitter user is worth $110.

Benedict Evans makes a great case that Mobile is a 1+ trillion dollar business, WhatsApp is disrupting the SMS part of this industry, which globally has over $100 billion in revenue, by sending 18 billion SMS messages a day when the global SMS system only sends 20 billion SMS messages a day.  With a fundamental change in the transition from PCs to nearly universal smartphone adoption, the size of the opportunity is a much larger addressable market than where Facebook normally plays.

But Facebook has promised no ads and no interference, so where’s the win?

There’s the interesting development of business use over mobile. WhatsApp is used to create group conversations for project teams and venture capitalists carry out deal flow conversations over WhatsApp.

Instagram is used in Kuwait to sell sheep.

WeChat, a WhatsApp competitor, launched a taxi-cab hailing service in January. In the first month 21 million cabs were hailed.

With the future of e-commerce looking like it will be funneled through mobile messaging apps, it must be an e-commerce play?

It’s not just businesses using WhatsApp for applications that were once on the desktop or on the web. Police officers in Spain use WhatsApp to catch criminals. People in Italy use it to organize basketball games.

Commerce and other applications are jumping on to mobile for obvious reasons. Everyone has mobile and these messaging applications are powerful, free, and cheap to use. No longer do you need a desktop or a web application to get things done. A lot of functionality can be overlayed on a messaging app.

So messaging is a threat to Google and Facebook. The desktop is dead. The web is dying. Messaging + mobile is an entire ecosystem that sidesteps their channel.

Facebook needs to get into this market or become irrelevant?

With the move to mobile we are seeing deportalization of Facebook. The desktop web interface for Facebook is a portal style interface providing access to all the features made available by the backend. It’s big, complicated, and creaky. Who really loves the Facebook UI?

When Facebook moved to mobile they tried the portal approach and it didn’t work. So they are going with a strategy of smaller, more focussed, purpose built apps. Mobile first! There’s only so much you can do on a small screen. On mobile it’s easier to go find a special app than it is to find a menu buried deep within a complicated portal style application.

But Facebook is going one step further. They are not only creating purpose built apps, they are providing multiple competing apps that provide similar functionality and these apps may not even share a backend infrastructure. We see this with Messenger and WhatsApp, Instagram and Facebook’s photo app. Paper is an alternate interface to Facebook that provides very limited functionality, but it does what it does very well.

Conway’s law may be operating here. The idea that “organizations which design systems … are constrained to produce designs which are copies of the communication structures of these organizations.” With a monolithic backend infrastructure we get a Borg-like portal design. The move to mobile frees the organization from this way of thinking. If apps can be built that provide a view of just a slice of the Facebook infrastructure then apps can be built that don’t use Facebook’s infrastructure at all. And if they don’t need Facebook’s infrastructure then they are free not to be built by Facebook at all. So exactly what is Facebook then?

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has his own take, saying in a keynote presentation at the Mobile World Congress that Facebook’s acquisition of WhatsApp was closely related to the Internet.org vision:

The idea is to develop a group of basic internet services that would be free of charge to use — “a 911 for the internet.” These could be a social networking service like Facebook, a messaging service, maybe search and other things like weather. Providing a bundle of these free of charge to users will work like a gateway drug of sorts — users who may be able to afford data services and phones these days just don’t see the point of why they would pay for those data services. This would give them some context for why they are important, and that will lead them to paying for more services like this — or so the hope goes.

This is the long play, which is a game that having a huge reservoir of valuable stock allows you to play. 

Have we reached a conclusion? I don’t think so. It’s such a stunning dollar amount with such tenuous apparent immediate rewards, that the long term play explanation actually does make some sense. We are still in the very early days of mobile. Nobody knows what the future will look like, so it pays not try to force the future to look like your past. Facebook seems to be doing just that.

But enough of this. How do you support 450 million active users with only 32 engineers? Let’s find out…


via High Scalability

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The “Four Hamiltons” Framework for Mitigating Faults in the Cloud: Avoid it, Mask it, Bound it, Fix it Fast:

This is a guest post by Patrick Eaton, Software Engineer and Distributed Systems Architect at Stackdriver.

Stackdriver provides intelligent monitoring-as-a-service for cloud hosted applications.  Behind this easy-to-use service is a large distributed system for collecting and storing metrics and events, monitoring and alerting on them, analyzing them, and serving up all the results in a web UI.  Because we ourselves run in the cloud (mostly on AWS), we spend a lot of time thinking about how to deal with faults in the cloud.  We have developed a framework for thinking about fault mitigation for large, cloud-hosted systems.  We endearingly call this framework the “Four Hamiltons” because it is inspired by an article from James Hamilton, the Vice President and Distinguished Engineer at Amazon Web Services.

The article that led to this framework is called “The Power Failure Seen Around the World”.  Hamilton analyzes the causes of the power outage that affected Super Bowl XLVII in early 2013.  In the article, Hamilton writes:

As when looking at any system faults, the tools we have to mitigate the impact are: 1) avoid the fault entirely, 2) protect against the fault with redundancy, 3) minimize the impact of the fault through small fault zones, and 4) minimize the impact through fast recovery.

The mitigation options are roughly ordered by increasing impact to the customer.  In this article, we will refer to these strategies, in order, as “Avoid it”, “Mask it”, “Bound it”, and “Fix it fast”…


via High Scalability

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11 Video Games From The 1980s That Are Better Than Games Today: <div>Please enable Javascript to watch this video</div>

 

You remember it all too well. Dusting off those much-used cartridges and plugging them into that box that sat just below your TV.

We combed through the best video games of the ’80s, and we discovered that those old games still have a ton of life left in them.

NOW WATCH: How To Solve A Rubik’s Cube

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via Tech

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Wolfram Language Demo Impresses: theodp writes “The devil will be in the details, but if you were stoked about last November’s announcement of the Wolfram programming language, you’ll be pleased to know that a just-released dry-but-insanely-great demo delivered by Stephen Wolfram does not disappoint. Even if you’re not in love with the syntax or are a FOSS devotee, you’ll find it hard not to be impressed by Wolfram’s 4-line solution to a traveling salesman tour of the capitals of Western Europe, 6-line camera-capture-to-image-manipulation demo, or 2-line web crawling and data visualization example. And that’s just for starters. So, start your Raspberry Pi engines, kids!” Share on Google+

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via Slashdot

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Game Frame - neat pixel art presentation gadget:

Jeremy Williams’ Kickstarter for Game Frame, “a grid of 256 ultra-bright LED pixels, perfect for showcasing pixel art and old school video game graphics,” is fully-funded.

    



via Boing Boing

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Paul Rand on Art and Aesthetics:

What a great snippet of a 1996 film by Preston McLanahan. I really like how Paul Rand bridges the gap between art, aesthetics, form, content and ultimately design. via Design Sojourn

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How To Solve A Rubik's Cube: <div>Please enable Javascript to watch this video</div>

Step 1: White Cross
You should be able to complete this step just by playing around with the cube.  Make sure that the edges of the cross match the center squares on the adjacent sides. 

Step 2: Finish First Layer

Step 3: Middle Layer
You may need to move some middle layer edge pieces from the top layer.  Follow the patterns below to get these pieces in the right places.  

Rubik's - Middle Layer

Step 4: Top Corners
To get the corners in the right place you can use this pattern to swap corners until all 4 corners are in the right location.  At this stage they do not need to be facing the right way. 

Rubik's Swap Corners

To orient corners use a combination of the patterns below.  The first will turn the faces of three corners clockwise.  The next will turn the faces of three faces counter-clockwise. 

Rubik's Clockwise

Step 5: Top Layer Edges In The Right Place
Make sure all the edges are in the right location.  Do not worry if they are facing the wrong way.  Use a combination of the patterns below to move these edge pieces.

Rubik's Permute Edges 

Step 6: Top Layer Edges Facing The Right Way
Use either of the patterns below or a combination to orient these edge pieces correctly.

Rubik's Final Layer Edges

NOW WATCH: The Monty Hall Problem: There’s A Right Answer But Even Genius Math Geeks Get It Wrong

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via Tech

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Here Are The Top 10 Emerging Technologies For 2014:

brain computer interface

The World Economic Forum, famous for its annual Davos convention in Switzerland, has put out a new report identifying the top technological trends for the coming year.

"Technology has become perhaps the greatest agent of change in the modern world," writes WEF’s Noubar Afeyan. "While never without risk, positive technological breakthroughs promise innovative solutions to the most pressing global challenges of our time, from resource scarcity to global environmental change."

"By highlighting the most important technological breakthroughs, the Council aims to raise awareness of their potential and contribute to closing gaps in investment, regulation and public understanding," he writes.

From wearable electronics to brain-computer interfaces, here are the big technologies to look out for this year.

1. Body-adapted Wearable Electronics

"These virtually invisible devices include earbuds that monitor heart rate, sensors worn under clothes to track posture, a temporary tattoo that tracks health vitals and haptic shoe soles that communicate GPS directions through vibration alerts felt by the feet.

"The applications are many and varied: haptic shoes are currently proposed for helping blind people navigate, while Google Glass has already been worn by oncologists to assist in surgery via medical records and other visual information accessed by voice commands."

Source: WEF

2. Nanostructured Carbon Composites

“Emissions from the world’s rapidly-growing fleet of vehicles are an environmental concern, and raising the operating efficiency of transport is a promising way to reduce its overall impact.

"New techniques to nanostructure carbon fibers for novel composites are showing the potential in vehicle manufacture to reduce the weight of cars by 10% or more. Lighter cars need less fuel to operate, increasing the efficiency of moving people and goods and reducing greenhouse gas emissions.”

Source: WEF

3. Mining Metals from Desalination Brine

As freshwater continues to dwindle, desalinating seawater has emerged as an option. “Desalination has serious drawbacks, however. In addition to high energy use, the process produces a reject-concentrated brine, which can have a serious impact on marine life when returned to the sea.

"Perhaps the most promising approach to solving this problem is to see the brine from desalination not as waste, but as a resource to be harvested for valuable materials. These include lithium, magnesium and uranium, as well as the more common sodium, calcium and potassium elements.” 

Source: WEF

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

    





via Tech

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How Mobile Apps Are Reinventing the Worst of the Software Industry: An anonymous reader writes “Jeff Atwood, co-founder of Stack Overflow, says the mobile app ecosystem is getting out of hand. ‘Your platform now has a million apps? Amazing! Wonderful! What they don’t tell you is that 99% of them are awful junk that nobody would ever want.’ Atwood says most companies trying to figure out how to get users to install their app should instead be figuring out just why they need a mobile app in the first place. Fragmentation is another issue, as mobile devices continue to speciate and proliferate. ‘Unless you’re careful to build equivalent apps in all those places, it’s like having multiple parallel Internets. “No, sorry, it’s not available on that Internet, only the iOS phone Internet.” Or even worse, only on the United States iOS phone Internet.’ Monetization has turned into a race to the bottom, and it’s led to worries about just what an app will do with the permissions it’s asking for. Atwood concludes, ‘The tablet and phone app ecosystem is slowly, painstakingly reinventing everything I hated about the computer software industry before the web blew it all up.’” Share on Google+

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DARPA Funds Research Into a Network-Based Interpretation of Dreams: KentuckyFC writes “Despite the universal experience of dreaming, psychologists and neuroscientists have little understanding of its purpose and mechanisms, or how it varies from one culture to another. So new approaches to oneirology, or dream research, are always welcome. Now a DARPA-funded research team is using network science to analyse dreams for the first time. Dreams have become amenable to network studies because dream reports and their interpretations are now widely available on the web in repositories such as UC Santa Cruz’s Dreambank. The DARPA team crawled these databases in English, Chinese and Arabic for symbols that appear in dreams and their descriptions. They then created a network for each language by treating symbols as nodes and linking them to other nodes with similar descriptions. They then searched the networks for regions of more densely connected nodes that form communities. For example, in English, symbols such as ‘ladder,’ ‘hill’ and ‘goal” form just such a community, representing ‘achievement after a struggle.’ Finally, they compared the communities from different languages to look for similarities. The results show that dream symbols seem to be connected in similar ways regardless of the cultural background of the dreamers. That provides a new window into the cultural links between dreams experienced by people in different parts of the world.” Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




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Darpa Developing Tech to Detect Counterfeit Microchips in Military Gear: Darpa Developing Tech to Detect Counterfeit Microchips in Military GearDARPA has taken on a new role in military procurement: quality control. The military’s research agency is developing a device to detect used and counterfeit electronic components in the Pentagon’s supply chain, hoping to get a handle on a problem the agency …

    



via Danger Room

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Fragments of Him prototype - designer's post-mortem: Scope, sexuality, and scripts - by Mata Haggis:

With a time limit of three days, an emotional narrative, multiple in-game locations, and issues of sexuality, it was going to be a challenge controlling the scope of the Fragments of Him prototype. This post describes how we did it, and what we learnt. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Nichibutsu Arcade Classics > SuperFamicom:
Nichibutsu Arcade Classics

Title : Nichibutsu Arcade Classics
Publisher : Nichibutsu
Game Type : A Bit Special
Console : SuperFamicom

Price : £11.99

Contains three arcade classics on the one cart: Moon Cresta, Crazy Climber and Frisky Tom. So we have a pre-Galga shooter with the steady hand eye co-ordination required for the docking levels, a climbing game where opening windows, flying plant pots and bird droppings conspire to hinder your progress to the top of the building and finally a puzzler where the water pipe must be repaired to help the fair lady get her shower. Quite a mixed bunch then.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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