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Hey! You're looking at the front page of recorder.sayforward.com which is a temporary storage place for articles I didn't read/evaluate yet. I also use this platform to prepare new content to post sayforward.com where audio/video/image material is hosted completely on my server. On the recorder instead, media is loaded from external sources, so don't get mad if some of them don't work anymore.

Please note that the content posted here is explicitly intended to help me remember certain things, i.e. it is not intended to entertain you in any way (although you certainly will find stuff that fulfills this criteria).

Now: Happy Browsing!

Herding robots: New system combines control programs so fleets of robots can collaborate:

A new system combines simple control programs to enable fleets of robots — or other “multiagent systems” — to collaborate in unprecedented ways. via Artificial Intelligence News — ScienceDaily

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A 'Dark Pattern' In Flappy Bird Reveals How Apple's Mysterious App Store Ranking Algorithm Works:

flappy bird icon faby

It is the bane of everyone in the mobile app development industry: How do Apple’s App Store rankings actually work?

Billions of dollars hang on the answer, as thousands of companies making hundreds of thousands of apps hope that somehow their brand will climb into the top 10, thus attaining mobile gold mine status.

Exhibit A is Flappy Bird, the simple but infuriating game in which players must steer a yellow bird between gaps in a set of green pipes. It made a reported $50,000 a day in revenues — until designer Dong Nguyen pulled it from the store because he couldn’t handle the global fame it brought him.

From the users’ point of view, the App Store rankings are just “there”: Whatever gets the most downloads in the “Paid,” “Free” and “Top Grossing” categories, gets ranked.

But if you’re a developer, getting attention for your app, and getting enough people to download it, is a chicken-and-egg nightmare. For users to find your app it must be near the top of the rankings; but apps cannot get to the top of the rankings unless users have already downloaded the app.

Somehow, without any marketing budget whatsoever, Flappy Bird unlocked this puzzle in a matter of weeks. At one point, the app was receiving 600 user reviews a day; it got more user reviews than Candy Crush Saga, the ubiquitous match-3 game from King. It was the No.1 app in the store.

In an essay on Venture Beat, Michael Silverwood of Silicon Valley mobile startup accelerator Tandem Capital, describes how people believe Apple’s ranking algorithm actually works (bear in mind nobody outside Apple knows precisely how the ranks are calculated):

Apple obviously doesn’t make this public knowledge, but anecdotally app developers have come to believe the current iteration works something like this:

Ranking = (# of installs weighted for the past few hours) + (# of installs weighted for the past few days) + REVIEWS (star rating + number of reviews) + Engagement (# of times app opened etc.) + Sales ($)

OK, all well and good. So how did Flappy benefit? Through the use of what user interface designers call “dark patterns,” or tricks that confuse users:

In earlier versions of the game, there was a “rate” button at the end of each play session, and this button was placed in the same location that the player would tap to play. As a result, when the user wanted to continue playing, it was easy to hit the rate button instead. This is known as a dark pattern: when a user interface is designed to get users to do something that they would not otherwise intentionally do.

That’s it: Flappy Bird was, perhaps, not a Reddit meme that got out of hand or a scam created by Satan, as conspiracy theorists believe.

It was popular simply because two buttons on the game control panel were placed too close together.

SEE ALSO: An iPhone 5S With Flappy Bird Installed Is Selling For $99,900 On eBay

Join the conversation about this story »



    





via Tech

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Console developers need to look at Dungeon Keeper and learn:

"We don’t have a mobile gaming industry anymore. We have a mobile scamming industry."

So said Thomas Baekdal in a column last week, swinging for the head of a nail with a strike so true that I found myself letting out an involuntary splutter of agreement.

It wasn’t so long ago that mobile gaming - and by extension tablet gaming - was the great white hope. Amidst the stagnation of traditional console and computer games, mobile was a hotbed of imagination and innovation where none of the usual rules applied. As the big old studios and publishers disintegrated, mobile allowed the smartest survivors to land on their feet and make the kind of games they and we really cared about.

Read more…

via Eurogamer.net

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The Future of In-App Advertising - by Maryna Petrenko:

Thoughts about how many ads can be shown without bothering users, yet still make enough money for developers, and at the same time get enough impressions for advertisers. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Efficient Data Structure for Storing Game Objects:

For the past year or so I’ve been toying with game engine dev on and off and I’ve tried a couple different approaches to allocating and storing “game objects” (actors, entities, whatever you want to call them). For a couple months now I’ve favored the solution presented in this Stack Exchange answer: http://ift.tt/1bnHgUn

To put it briefly, the solution described is an array where allocated objects are kept contiguous in memory for the sake of cache coherency by swapping the object highest in memory with any gaps created during deallocation. It also uses two levels of indirection to maintain stable unique ids for referencing the moving objects.

The author on Stack Exchange didn’t mention this, but the data structure could easily be augmented by making it a struct of arrays using the same id allocation/dereferencing scheme.

I like this solution, but it has some flaws that always concerned me:

  1. How long does it take to swap an object during deallocation? My game objects have a huge amount of data associated with them: Location, rotation, a 4x4 world matrix, a 4x4 world-view-projection matrix, a 3x3 world-inverse-transpose matrix… those alone make up at least 47 floats, or 188 bytes.
  2. Swapping is not only an issue for deallocation. Sorting would have the same implications. What if I want to sort my objects for some reason, e.g. to reduce GL state changes during rendering. I assume a cache miss on a small game object component on the CPU is nothing compared to a cache miss on the GPU looking for an entire texture.

While making my own implementation of the data structure, I realized something: x86 cache lines are usually only 64 bytes long now-adays. That’s only one 4x4 float matrix. If I’m doing matrix heavy calculations (which are ripe of tight loop and multi-threading optimizations), so long as the matricies are cache-aligned, I don’t have to worry about contiguousness for the sake of cache coherency. Without the need for contiguousness, there’s no need to swap during deallocation. That solves my first concern. It has the added bonus of reducing the levels of indirection from two to one since the objects will never move in memory.

Also, while I’m no longer keeping the objects themselves compact in memory, I’m still maintaining a list of allocated ids that’s compact. This way, all objects can be iterated over without wasting time with unallocated objects. As a plus, this list of allocated ids can simply be the other half of an unallocated id list (or “free list” as the Stack Exchange author calls it).

The list of allocated ids can also be sorted efficiently as per my second concern, since you only need to swap integers and not entire objects. Just make sure you update any “reverse ids” for efficient deallocation accordingly (this can be done with one linear pass of the sorted allocated id list). Also, if you make the id number itself part of your sorting criteria, that would theoretically improve cache coherency during iteration.

Below is a sample C++ template that implements the id management of the data structure.

#include 
#include 
#include 

template
class id_manager
{
private:
  typedef std::array array_type;

public:
  typedef IdType size_type;
  typedef typename array_type::value_type value_type;
  typedef typename array_type::difference_type difference_type;
  typedef typename array_type::const_reference const_reference;
  typedef typename array_type::const_pointer const_pointer;
  typedef typename array_type::const_iterator const_iterator;
  typedef typename array_type::const_reverse_iterator const_reverse_iterator;

private:
  size_type _size;

  // The first _size elements in _ids are allocated ids.
  // The remaining elements are unallocated ids.
  array_type _ids;

  // _reverse_ids maps ids to indexes into the _ids table for efficient
  // deallocation.
  array_type _reverse_ids;

public:
  id_manager()
    : _size(0)
  {
    // All entries in _ids are initially unallocated.
    for (IdType i = 0; i < MaxSize; ++i)
    {
      _ids[i] = i;
    }
  }

  IdType allocate_id()
  {
    if (_size == MaxSize)
    {
      throw std::length_error(
            "Attempt to allocate beyond this id_manager's maximum size");
    }

    IdType result = _ids[_size];
    _reverse_ids[result] = _size;

    ++_size;
    return result;
  }

  void deallocate_id(IdType target)
  {
    --_size;

    // Swap the now unallocated gap with the end of the allocated section.
    IdType reverse_id = _reverse_ids[target];
    std::swap(_ids[reverse_id], _ids[_size]);
    _reverse_ids[_ids[reverse_id]] = reverse_id;
  }

  void clear()
  {
    _size = 0;

    // All entries in _ids are reset to unallocated.
    for (IdType i = 0; i < MaxSize; ++i)
    {
      _ids[i] = i;
    }
  }

  bool empty() const
  {
    return _size == 0;
  }

  size_type size() const
  {
    return _size;
  }

  size_type max_size() const
  {
    return MaxSize;
  }

  const_iterator begin() const
  {
    return _ids.begin();
  }

  const_iterator end() const
  {
    return _ids.begin() + _size;
  }

  const_reverse_iterator rbegin() const
  {
    return const_reverse_iterator(end());
  }

  const_reverse_iterator rend() const
  {
    return const_reverse_iterator(begin());
  }
};

The ids can be used as indices into arrays of object data with the same max_size().

I haven’t actually done performance tests, but I can’t think of a better solution if sorting (or simply not swapping during deallocation) is more important to you than contiguous memory.

What do you all think? Are my priorities in the right place? Any enhancements you can think of?

via GameDev.net Forums RSS

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TED: Leyla Acaroglu: Paper beats plastic? How to rethink environmental folklore - Leyla Acaroglu (2013):

Most of us want to do the right thing when it comes to the environment. But things aren’t as simple as opting for the paper bag, says sustainability strategist Leyla Acaroglu. A bold call for us to let go of tightly-held green myths and think bigger in order to create systems and products that ease strain on the planet. via TEDTalks (video)

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Foxconn und Google arbeiten gemeinsam an Robotern:

Foxconn ist besser bekannt als Vertragspartner von Apple und zuständig für den Zusammenbau der Einzelteile von iPhones. Wie das Wall Street Journal nun allerdings berichtet, arbeitet Foxconn auch mit Google zusammen, um die Fertigung weiter zu automatisieren. Derzeit beschäftigt das taiwanesische Unternehmen alleine in China rund eine Million Angestellte. via gulli:News

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Nigerian restaurant busted for cannibal cuisine:

A hotel restaurant in Onitsha, Nigeria was reportedly shuttered after authorities confirmed it was selling dishes containing human meat. According to the Naija Zip, self-described as an er, “gossip news” site, police discovered two human heads on the premises along with weapons and ammunition.

    



via Boing Boing

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Why Video Games Like Flappy Bird Are So Addictive:

Why Video Games Like Flappy Bird Are So Addictive

Every gamer has experienced the thrill of winning and the agony of defeat. But what exactly is going on in our brains when we play, and why can’t we stop playing even punishing games (like Flappy Bird)? The Daily Dot offers an explanation.

via Lifehacker

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In Defense of Flappy Bird - by Alan Wagner:

Gaming culture’s unduly harsh treatment of mega-simple megahit Flappy Bird hints at larger problems within our community. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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How Technology Is Changing Education : Kshitij Kumar at TEDxGBU:

How Technology Is Changing Education : Kshitij Kumar at TEDxGBU

17 yrs old, Investor & Entrepreneur. Co Founder and CEO, Blix Corporation. Entrepreneur in Residence (EiR) at GSF (Global Superangels Forum). Started coding …

From:
TEDxTalks

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Careto (the Mask): long-running, sophisticated APT malware:

Researchers at Kaspersky Labs have uncovered a new, long-lived piece of espionage malware called Careto (Spanish for “Mask”). The software, which attacks Windows, Mac OS and GNU/Linux, has been running since at least 2007 and has successfully targeted at least 380 victims in 31 countries, gaining access via directed spear-phishing attacks, which included setting up fake sites to impersonate The Guardian.

    



via Boing Boing

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Webhooks Level Up:

Comments via Hacker News

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Original author: 
r_adams

Moving from physical servers to the "cloud" involves a paradigm shift in thinking. Generally in a physical environment you care about each invididual host; they each have their own static IP, you probably monitor them individually, and if one goes down you have to get it back up ASAP. You might think you can just move this infrastructure to AWS and start getting the benefits of the "cloud" straight away. Unfortunately, it's not quite that easy (believe me, I tried). You need think differently when it comes to AWS, and it's not always obvious what needs to be done.

So, inspired by Sehrope Sarkuni's recent post, here's a collection of AWS tips I wish someone had told me when I was starting out. These are based on things I've learned deploying various applications on AWS both personally and for my day job. Some are just "gotcha"'s to watch out for (and that I fell victim to), some are things I've heard from other people that I ended up implementing and finding useful, but mostly they're just things I've learned the hard way.

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Why Indie Developers Go Insane - by Jeff Vogel:

What we learned this week: Becoming a public figure does weird things to the human brain. Flappy Bird did absolutely nothing wrong, and a lot of the gaming press owe the author an apology. People troll because it works. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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TED: Dan Berkenstock: The world is one big dataset. Now, how to photograph it ... - Dan Berkenstock (2013):

We’re all familiar with satellite imagery, but what we might not know is that much of it is out of date. That’s because satellites are big and expensive, so there aren’t that many of them up in space. As he explains in this fascinating talk, Dan Berkenstock and his team came up with a different solution, designing a cheap, lightweight satellite with a radically new approach to photographing what’s going on on Earth. via TEDTalks (video)

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Introduction to WebGL with Tony Parisi:

Introduction to WebGL with Tony Parisi

From:
Google Developers

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All about WebGL at SFHTML5 - Panel QA:

All about WebGL at SFHTML5 - Panel QA

From:
Google Developers

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DevArt - Zach Lieberman:

DevArt - Zach Lieberman

DevArt is a new type of art. It is made with code, by developers that push the possibilities of creativity and technology. g.co/devart Calling all creative coders. Technology is your canvas….

From:
Google Developers

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Art Is The Memory Of Mankind: Greg Ibanez at TEDxUTA:

Art Is The Memory Of Mankind: Greg Ibanez at TEDxUTA

In over 32 years of architectural practice, Greg has produced a diverse body of work that has been widely recognized and published. In an era of ever-increas…

From:
TEDxTalks

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QUIC: next generation multiplexed transport over UDP:

QUIC: next generation multiplexed transport over UDP

QUIC (Quick UDP Internet Connections, pronounced ‘quick’) is a next generation transport over UDP, which aims to reduce latency (goal: 0-RTT connectivity ove…

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Getting Started With Pattern Libraries:

Three weeks ago, A List Apart went open source. The markup on the website is something I feel very close to. Over the years, if I’ve been unsure of how to mark something up, I’ve often referenced the HTML on A List Apart to see how it’s been done there because I know the people who work on it really care about semantics.

Uncertain of how I could help, I suggested to the team that A List Apart have its own pattern library. Pattern libraries are something I do a lot for client projects and I thought the site could really benefit from one.

It’s a technique I first saw former Clearlefty Natalie Downe develop for client projects back in 2009, and has been used by Clearleft as a front-end deliverable since. They’ve evolved a lot over time to include things like usage notes and code snippets.

A couple of days later, with some help from Mat “Wilto” Marquis, we had a repository for the pattern library up and running complete with a live preview.

Features of A List Apart’s pattern library

A screenshot showing the layout of A List Apart’s pattern library site.Clicking on the # shows the pattern in isolation (great for bug-fixing). Usage examples can be included by adding a .txt file with the same name in the pattern folder.

All the pattern files (snippets of markup) are in their own folder, and adding one in there automatically adds it to the library. I’m using some PHP from Paul Lloyd’s Barebones, his own blend of a pattern library, to output the patterns in the right format.

By breaking the site up into patterns, it’s easier to find those bits of markup. I noticed an issue on GitHub about there being no styles for dl, dd, and dt elements, and it took a while to find an example of them being used on the site. With a pattern library, all the elements that appear on the site are in one place so you don’t have to go searching round for them.

It also makes device testing easier because everything is on one page. I made a special patchwork view specifically for this, which is the same as the regular view, but all the patterns are at full width and it excludes the code and usage examples. It’s also quick to see if CSS changes to one pattern affect other patterns.

It’s a work in progress, and the first time I’ve built one after a site has gone live. (Normally I do them during development). There aren’t many patterns there at the moment, but I’ll be adding more. I’d also like to make it a one-stop-shop for grabbing site assets like logos.

Code for America’s Pattern Library

An example of a fully-fledged pattern library is Code for America’s, which I worked on with Clearleft.

The Code for America site is huge, and maintained by many different people. They wanted a redesign of their site, but delivering mockups of template after template would only be a tip of the iceberg and not really help them in the long-term. Templates are like a snapshot in time of a site, and they often can’t take into account when content changes or entirely new sections are created.

Since the project is so out in the open and encourages collaboration from the community, the code had to be documented well too.

We wanted to create a solid foundation that they could build upon, so we built them a system so they could build their own pages, the main deliverable for this being the Pattern Portfolio.

It encouraged a much more modular approach to development, the idea being that any pattern could be used anywhere on a template. Each pattern has its own .scss file, and the file name for that and the pattern’s markup are the same.

Designs for templates were still created to demonstrate how patterns could work together. After the Code for America team said they were thinking of using Jekyll for their site, I started using it (for the first time) to help me prototype these templates. It made code collaboration really easy because there was no database or required knowledge of PHP, so it’s now being used in production.

The site’s still being put together, and you can follow its progress on Github.

More pattern libraries

Some of my favorite examples of pattern libraries in the wild include those of Mailchimp and Starbucks. They’re comprehensive and well documented, they feel like the perfect deliverable because they help maintain code and design standards. They acknowledge that websites change over time and make it easier to make those changes without breaking stuff.

If you’re inspired to learn more, I have a bookmark collection of pattern libraries, and I’ve also written a pocket guide about them. Please chime in with your own favorite pattern library examples or resources in the comments as well.

via A List Apart: The Full Feed

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Amazing scenes from games:

Dead End Thrills is a site about the visual design of games.

Dead End Thrills is a website celebrating the passion and talent behind the world’s most exciting videogames.

    



via Boing Boing

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The best shows from Transmediale: We chart the top ten must-see shows at the Berlin art festival
Lumiere

This year’s Transmediale festival in Berlin bathes in the ‘afterglow’ – though not a nice warm pacified one – but instead a quiet rumbling portent of what has been set in motion over the last three decades of ‘excessive digitisation’ and the possible futures that loom large.  The focus is on the implications of the ‘post-digital’ and what is left behind; the waste and detritus of hyperproduction and networked existence. Themes that are in the…

read more »

via Dazed

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Wonder Momo > PCEngineHuCard:

Wonder Momo

Title : Wonder Momo
Publisher : Namcot
Game Type : Side Scrolling Beat Em Up
Console : PCEngineHuCard

Price : £4.99

This years school play is the setting for this bizarre Namcot title. Enemies include the Crab Fencer, the School Photographer (!) and of course a ninja. The Momo gauge powers up to transform into Wonder Momo.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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If You Thought Google Glass Was Creepy Before, Wait Until You See It Remotely Unlock A Door:

A new app for Google Glass, the wearable face-computer from Google, will let people answer the door directly from their headsets.

Fast Company reports Brivo Labs and topcoder’s development and design community collaborated to create OKDoor.

OKDoor receives an image from an outdoor camera when someone is at the door and the Glass wearer can allow or deny entry by tapping on his or her Google Glass.

Here’s the demo video: 

SEE ALSO: Now you can create online dating profiles for the men you’re not interested in.

Join the conversation about this story »



    





via Tech

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Here's Bill Gates' Vision For The Future Of Computing (MSFT):

Somewhat lost in the commotion of Microsoft appointing Satya Nadella as CEO was the fact that Bill Gates is coming back.

Gates will spend about a third of his time working at Microsoft. He’s a technical advisor to Nadella, and will help with future product direction. 

It’s a fairly big deal that Gates is going to be involved with Microsoft. For years people have wanted Gates to come back to the company. 

There is a concern though that Gates has been out of the technology industry for so long that he won’t be able to cope with the changes that have come as Android and iOS have altered computing. 

Gates was recently on Jimmy Fallon’s show, and was asked about the future of computing. The answer isn’t super illuminating, but considering that he’s now helping to shape the future of Microsoft’s products, it’s worth watching.

At the 1:00 mark in this video, Gates lays out his vision.

He says computers will be more intelligent. They will see more, hear more, and just generally be more pervasive. He also thinks we’re going to be using a bunch of devices and the key is to make it easy to move from device to device. He thinks that idea of working at one computer with one keyboard and one screen is going away.

This sounds good for the future of Microsoft’s software.

But then, he takes a somewhat odd turn talking about how important handwriting recognition will be for the future of tablets. We’re not so sure about that one. 

Join the conversation about this story »



    





via Tech

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Government To Require Vehicle-to-vehicle Communication: An anonymous reader writes “For decades, the focus of auto safety has primarily been on surviving the traumatic impact of crashes through features like air bags and seat belts. But now the focus has shifted to avoiding crashes by developing technology to make future vehicles ‘smart’ enough to detect and respond to threats, such as an oncoming vehicle. The technology, known as ‘vehicle-to-vehicle,’ or “V2V,” lets cars ‘talk’ to each other and exchange safety data, such as speed and position. If a nearby car abruptly changes lanes and moves into another car’s blind spot, the car would be alerted. Federal transportation officials did not announce when the new regulations would go into effect but said they hope to propose the new V2V rules before President Barack Obama leaves office in January 2017.” Combine this with remote kill-switches or pulse guns, Amber-alert scrolling signs, proliferating cameras, automatic plate recognition and unstoppable text messages from on high for some not-so-distant driving dystopia. Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




via Slashdot

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James Franco Remembers Philip Seymour Hoffman

The last time I...:

James Franco Remembers Philip Seymour Hoffman

The last time I ran into Philip was at Bar Centrale, a theater restaurant, when he came in with a group that included Chris Rock, Zach Braff, and a bunch of great stage actors. At the time, I had read that Philip had gone to rehab for heroin. I was shocked, because you don’t think that a person who absolutely everyone acknowledges as great, would have such problems. But that was foolish, because addiction cares nothing for personality. It is an illness, not a matter of will, class, intelligence, or lifestyle. I have no idea what happened to Phil before he was found dead, but a friend of mine told me they saw him the day before he passed and he looked happy. This says to me that Philip was not someone who had given up. He didn’t throw it all away. He was just someone—a very special someone—who was sick. His death is shocking to us because his greatness made him seem invincible. At the very least, all the incredible art he gave us should warrant him another chance. 

Read the whole piece

via VICE

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Audience Jeers Contestant Who Uses Game Theory To Win At 'Jeopardy': Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes “USA Today reports that Arthur Chu, an insurance compliance analyst and aspiring actor, has won $102,800 in four Jeopardy! appearances using a strategy — jumping around the board instead of running categories straight down, betting odd amounts on Daily Doubles and doing a final wager to tie — that has fans calling him a ‘villain’ and ‘smug.’ It’s Arthur’s in-game strategy of searching for the Daily Double that has made him such a target. Typically, contestants choose a single category and progressively move from the lowest amount up to the highest, giving viewers an easy-to-understand escalation of difficulty. But Arthur has his sights solely set on finding those hidden Daily Doubles, which are usually located on the three highest-paying rungs in the categories (the category itself is random). That means, rather than building up in difficulty, he begins at the most difficult questions. Once the two most difficult questions have been taken off the board in one column, he quickly jumps to another category. It’s a grating experience for the viewer, who isn’t given enough to time to get in a rhythm or fully comprehend the new subject area. ‘The more unpredictable you are, the more you put your opponents off-balance, the longer you can keep an initial advantage,’ says Chu. ‘It greatly increases your chance of winning the game if you can pull it off, and I saw no reason not to do it.’ Another contra-intuitive move Chu has made is playing for a tie rather than to win in ‘Final Jeopardy’ because that allows you advance to the next round which is the most important thing, not the amount of money you win in one game. ‘In terms of influence on the game,Arthur looks like a trendsetter of things to come,’ says Eric Levenson. ‘Hopefully that has more to do with his game theory than with his aggressive button-pressing.’” Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




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New Coffee Soap by Maaklab in Portland
Are you as addicted to...
:

New Coffee Soap by Maaklab in Portland

Are you as addicted to the smell of coffee like everyone here at the FvF office? Then this Coffee Bar Soap is something for you.

Based on a strong brew of fresh roasted beans from the streets of Portland, this soap imparts notes of a dark roast and toasted oats, making it a natural deodorizer with ground espresso beans mildly exfoliating your skin.

Get it here.

via Freunde von Freunden

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Fire Destroys Iron Mountain Data Warehouse, Argentina's Bank Records Lost: cagraham writes “A fire at Iron Mountain’s data warehouse in Buenos Aires left the facility ‘ruined’ and killed nine first-responders, according to the Washington Post. The origin of the fire is unknown. The facility was supposedly equipped with sprinkler systems, fire control systems, and had a private emergency team on standby. Among the records destroyed are Argentina’s bank archives, the loss of which could have some surprisingly far-reaching implications.” Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




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Neurocam - A Headset Which Records Everything You're Interested In:

It only takes a quick visit to any major tourist attraction to realise that a lot of people have an innate desire to document almost every part of their lives. Recognising this market, Tokyo-based company Neurowear have developed a head-mounted camera that can monitor the wearer’s brainwaves and can start recording whenever they become interested in something.

Continue Reading… via HUH.

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ASCII art and its precursors:

Alexis Madrigal explores the history of typewritten images, from their present nadir in YouTube comments to Illustrated Phonographic World’s 1893 efforts to prove the value of the medium.

    



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Yes, This is A Computer Generated Character:

Stockholm, Sweden-based vfx shop Important Looking Pirates created the impressive animation for this Aco skin care product commercial. via Cartoon Brew

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Brutus Magazine – Otomo Katsuhiro Special Book Review:

This book is a revised edition of the Otomo Katsuhiro Special issue released back in April 2012 ( for coverage on Otomo’s Genga Exhibition in Tokyo ) by Brutus, a Japanese pop culture magazine. The contents have since been expanded/updated to cover more of Otomo Katsuhiro’s work in the past year. (above) The book kicks […] via Halcyon Realms - Animation.Film.Photography and Art Book Reviews

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The Wire creator David Simon on "America as a Horror Show":

Above: The Wire creator David Simon suggested that Tom Perkins sell his $300,000 wristwatch and use the proceeds to open a couple of drug rehab centers in Baltimore.

    



via Boing Boing

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A beautiful, synapse-by-synapse tour of a brain:

National Geographic has a nice video (as well as a long story by Carl Zimmer) about scientists who are trying to learn more about the way the brain works by slicing mice brains into incredibly thin sections, fore to aft, and then using scans of those slices to create what amounts to a wiring diagram.

    



via Boing Boing

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ARM Researching Novel Chip Memory: An anonymous reader writes “ARM may be best known as processor designer but the company is now working on a non-volatile memory that could scale down to 5nm, according to an Electronics 360 report. The memory is something different called Correlated-electron RAM that was originally developed by a professor at University of Colorado. ARM is joining a research collaboration to try and make the memory an option at ARM-friendly foundries.” Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




via Slashdot

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