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Hey! You're looking at the front page of recorder.sayforward.com which is a temporary storage place for articles I didn't read/evaluate yet. I also use this platform to prepare new content to post sayforward.com where audio/video/image material is hosted completely on my server. On the recorder instead, media is loaded from external sources, so don't get mad if some of them don't work anymore.

Please note that the content posted here is explicitly intended to help me remember certain things, i.e. it is not intended to entertain you in any way (although you certainly will find stuff that fulfills this criteria).

Now: Happy Browsing!

Meching Your Mind Up: Five New Minutes Of Brigador:

We previously covered Brigador when it was called Matador, and while the name has changed the subject remains the same: mech combat in a dark, futuristic world. Its isometric perspective and dimly lit city streets make it look a touch like Syndicate, but the destructive potential of its stompy bots mean that it plays like […] via Rock, Paper, Shotgun

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Game monetization design: Analysis of Hay Day - by Pete Koistila:

"Design is not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works." –Steve Jobs. Supercell team has understood what Jobs meant. Let’s analyze why Hay Day is very addictive and why it creates turnover to Supercell regularly. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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The Strategy of Video Game Whales - by Kevin Harwood:

Video Game Whales have been discussed on here on Gamasutra before, but the numerical position has seemingly been ignored. This article discusses the basic concept and digs into strategy. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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You Should Probably Pay Attention To IndiE3:

You may not have noticed – for instance, because you are under a rock, in space, or dead – but E3 is happening. So far, it’s been about as predictable as they come: sequels we already new about, a couple “hmmm, that might actually be interesting” standouts, and a whole, whole, whole lot of console-focused […] via Rock, Paper, Shotgun

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Game Design Challenge - Winner Announced! - by Rob Lockhart:

I announce the winner of the Game Design Challenge! via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Amazing Minimalist Soccer Players Illustrations By Daniel Nyari:

Daniel Nyari is an artist of the minimalism. His re-creation of soccer club logos are a huge success, and his…



via Design You Trust

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InSomnia Has Old-School RPG Style, Modern Graphics:

If you’ll remember, we’ve posted about InSomnia before on RPS – Adam because he came across the “dieselpunk” post-apocalyptic role-player’s Kickstarter page, and me because I never sleep. Unfortunately, the Kickstarter ultimately met its untimely end in the dank, art deco-rated tunnels of obscurity, pulling in only a small fraction of the $70,000 it needed. […] via Rock, Paper, Shotgun

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Live Free Play Hard: The Spacebar Plays A Crucial Role:

This Sunday: skulls, signals, stuttering, and sinewaves. Send submissions to @nobodybutyours. … [visit site to read more] via Rock, Paper, Shotgun

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Games That Make Players Act Like Psychopaths: An article at Wired takes a look at two multiplayer survival games, DayZ and Rust, and at the behavior of players when their actions are freed from a civilized moral code. ‘Violence wouldn’t bother a psychopath, [Dr. Adam Perkins] says, but they might have another incentive to avoid violence: the consequences of getting caught. Most psychopaths are logical people, he says, and understand that actions bring consequences. The threat of repercussions — say, for example, prison — might keep them from acting out. Such disincentives do not exist in virtual worlds. Absent a sense of empathy, you’re free to rob and kill at will. What we do with this reveals something about us. Jon Ronson, author of The Psychopath Test, says imagining ourselves doing something horrible is a way to see ourselves in a new light. “One of the ways we keep ourselves moral is to imagine the terrible things we could do, but then don’t do,” Ronson says. “You stand on a train platform and think, ‘I could push that person in front of the train.’ That thought pops into your head, and it doesn’t make you a lunatic. It makes you a good person, because what you’re actually saying is, ‘Oh my god, I’m capable of doing a terrible thing, but I would never actually do it.’” … But we’re still left with the big question: Are our actions in a virtual world tantamount to imagining those things we could do in real life but never would? Or are we merely behaving as we would in real life if there were no consequences for our actions?’ Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




via Slashdot

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The Flaw Lurking In Every Deep Neural Net: mikejuk (1801200) writes “A recent paper, ‘Intriguing properties of neural networks,’ by Christian Szegedy, Wojciech Zaremba, Ilya Sutskever, Joan Bruna, Dumitru Erhan, Ian Goodfellow and Rob Fergus, a team that includes authors from Google’s deep learning research project, outlines two pieces of news about the way neural networks behave that run counter to what we believed — and one of them is frankly astonishing. Every deep neural network has ‘blind spots’ in the sense that there are inputs that are very close to correctly classified examples that are misclassified. To quote the paper: ‘For all the networks we studied, for each sample, we always manage to generate very close, visually indistinguishable, adversarial examples that are misclassified by the original network.’ To be clear, the adversarial examples looked to a human like the original, but the network misclassified them. You can have two photos that look not only like a cat but the same cat, indeed the same photo, to a human, but the machine gets one right and the other wrong. What is even more shocking is that the adversarial examples seem to have some sort of universality. That is a large fraction were misclassified by different network architectures trained on the same data and by networks trained on a different data set. You might be thinking ‘so what if a cat photo that is clearly a photo a cat is recognized as a dog?’ If you change the situation just a little and ask what does it matter if a self-driving car that uses a deep neural network misclassifies a view of a pedestrian standing in front of the car as a clear road? There is also the philosophical question raised by these blind spots. If a deep neural network is biologically inspired we can ask the question, does the same result apply to biological networks? Put more bluntly, ‘Does the human brain have similar built-in errors?’ If it doesn’t, how is it so different from the neural networks that are trying to mimic it?” Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




via Slashdot

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Robotics Engineers: "We Don't Want To Replace Humans. We Want To Enhance Humans.: Lucas123 writes: ‘Scientists developing smart robotic prosthetics say the lines between robots and humans is beginning to blur and that someday soon people will be able to improve their body. For example, robotic prosthetics, using a built-in computer, 100 sensors, and 17 motors, can take natural cues from a user’s residual limb, giving him or her the dexterity and grace to play a piano. Robotic exoskeletons have helped people suffering from paralysis walk again and the U.S. military is just weeks away from testing a new exoskeleton. And, more than six years ago, a University of Arizona researcher who had successfully connected a moth’s brain to a robot predicted that by 2022 we’ll be using “hybrid” computers that run a combination of technology and living organic tissue. “By utilizing technology, you’re able to improve your body beyond anything you could do in the past,” said Daniel Wilson, an engineer with degrees in machine learning and robotics from Carnegie Mellon University.’ Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.




via Slashdot

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Long Nose Goblin (Hanatakadaka) (New) > PCEngineHuCard:
Long Nose Goblin (Hanatakadaka) (New)

Title : Long Nose Goblin (Hanatakadaka) (New)
Publisher : Taito
Game Type : Shoot Em Up
Console : PCEngineHuCard

Price : £77.99

The very sort of wacked out game that Western gamers so often sadly miss out on. Introducing fellow gamers to the delights of titles as full of colour and culture as this is Genki’s raison d’etre. Think a side-scrolling Kikikaikai.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Crying > MegaDrive:
Crying

Title : Crying
Publisher : Sega
Game Type : Shoot Em Up
Console : MegaDrive

Price : £37.99

Set on the planet of Avalon which has been invaded by gentially modified creatures, gameplay is given a more cerebral element through the addition of colour coded power ups. Some weapons will prove near useless against certain enemies. Cave, underwater, factory, base and jungle levels complete with out of control lush green plants and insects. Known as Bio Hazard Battle in the West.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Super Schwarzschild > PCEngineCDROM:
Super Schwarzschild

Title : Super Schwarzschild
Publisher : Kogado
Game Type : Simulation
Console : PCEngineCDROM

Price : £7.99

If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery then Macross creator Kawamori-san should be honoured by this space epic set in a not so distant future.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Gaia Seed > PlayStation:
Gaia Seed

Title : Gaia Seed
Publisher : Techno
Game Type : Shoot Em Up
Console : PlayStation

Price : £119.99

The PlayStation gets its Radiant Silvergun rival with some superb results for this lesser known outer orbit blast. Chunkier sprites in the Irem style with some delightful parallax scrolling in the background for those with the luxury of being able to appreciate it. The stirring soundtrack sounds like Enya has produced it with suitable out of space mystery and intrigue wrapped up in its echoey notes.Imaginitive, creative, organic bosses lie in wait, often illuminated by the glow of planet Earth in the background with the eerie soundtrack. High end import gaming: believe the hype. Sometimes known as GaiaSeed Project Seed Trap.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Taito Memories Two Vol One (Hits) (New) > PS2:
Taito Memories Two Vol One (Hits) (New)

Title : Taito Memories Two Vol One (Hits) (New)
Publisher : Taito
Game Type : A Bit Special
Console : PS2

Price : £24.99

A tasty twenty five slices of Taito coin op history with something for everyone to roll up and play. Of those that may be unfamiliar to Genki gaming gurus, Ben Bero Bee is a nice Elevator Action style platformer with raging fires requiring extinguishing. Ninja Kids is a fun fight title with Asuka & Asuka and Flying hawk two very tidy shooters. More familiar territory comes in the shape of Darius II, Rayforce, Bubble Memories, SCI, Chuka Taisen and Rainbow Islands providing some real class.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Pixar Art Director Ricky Nierva TED Talk: The Creative Process Behind Pixar’s ‘Up’:

Pixar Art Director/Production Designer Ricky Nierva recently gave a TED Talk at TED x Athens in Athens, Greece. Titled “Don’t Be Afraid Of The Blank Sheets”, Nierva’s talk is about writers block and the artist’s struggle with the creative process and a behind the scenes peek into the design behind the magic created at Pixar. […]

The post Pixar Art Director Ricky Nierva TED Talk: The Creative Process Behind Pixar’s ‘Up’ appeared first on /Film.

via /Film

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Watch 'Tetris' evolve over 30 years:

via The Verge - All Posts

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Handbook to figure out what's in the public domain:


Jennifer Urban sez, “I’m happy to say that the Samuelson Clinic at Berkeley has just released a handbook to help folks research whether older items (pre-1978) are still under copyright in the U.S., or are in the public domain.” This is probably the most esoteric question that normal people from all walks of life have to answer routinely; the Samuelson Clinic has really done an important public service here.

Interestingly the project originated with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Legacy Project, “a nonprofit organization run by civil rights movement veterans that is creating a digital archive of historical materials.”
Read the rest

via Boing Boing

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First-person shooter engine in 265 lines of Javascript:


Hunter Loftis, who created the fractal terrain generation in 130 lines of Javascript engine, has done it again: a a full-blown first-person shooter engine in 265 lines (demo, source). He used a technique called ray casting, and goes into some detail about this choice and where this could go next.
Read the rest

via Boing Boing

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Power Instinct (Cart Only) > SuperFamicom:
Power Instinct (Cart Only)

Title : Power Instinct (Cart Only)
Publisher : Atlus
Game Type : One on One Beat Em Up
Console : SuperFamicom

Price : £7.99

Brilliant characterisation makes this stand tall from the crowd but its the doubled up old lady Otane who’s the star of the show firing her dentures at opponents and twanging her knicker elastic in celebration. If you’re into weird and wondrous Japanese feeling games, you could do alot worse than try this for size.

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Super Bikkuriman (Cart Only) > SuperFamicom:
Super Bikkuriman (Cart Only)

Title : Super Bikkuriman (Cart Only)
Publisher : Interbec
Game Type : One on One Beat Em Up
Console : SuperFamicom

Price : £8.99

Bikkuri (or Surprise) Man is like a hero from animes past such as Battle of the Planets Gatchaman. But the game has more humour to its scrap action taking itself less seriously. There are plenty of thousand bird kick style attacks, but Genki is at a loss where that inspiration came from. Off to search for Cities of Gold and Dogtanian..!

via GenkiVideoGames.com - All New Arrivals

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Art Direction in Video Games - A roadmap for finishing your projects - by Ricky Baba:

These notes were inspired by the idea that it’s difficult (near impossible?) to complete art for a game. The challenge is keeping the team inspired while working against deadlines, disagreements & lulls of creativity. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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Cardboard Children – Rab’s Top 50 (20-11): The Video:

Hello youse. We’re inside the Top 20 on my amazing Top 50 board games of all time list. What will be there? Will your favourite be there? No, I’m afraid not. Ludo isn’t there. WATCH! … [visit site to read more] via Rock, Paper, Shotgun

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Evolution and history of London:

Using data from the National Heritage List for England, the London Evolution Animation shows the historical development of London. Mainly, … via FlowingData

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Halt and Catch Fire (2014):

Halt and Catch Fire

“You’ve made just enough safe choices to stay alive, but not to matter.” — Joe MacMillan

An idea can be a violent thing. Birthed out of nothingness, forcing its way into the world with a stroke of luck, a flash of inspiration, and sometimes, the push of a button.

In the opening to AMC’s new period drama Halt and Catch Fire, a spark blazes a trail through sheer red, scorching an idea into existence. Zeroes become ones. Input becomes output. The characters’ faces, nothing more than glitchy approximations, are barely recognizable in the vermillion void.

Set against the backdrop of the 1980s tech industry, the series details the conception and rise of the personal computer. The sequence is our gateway into this system, the interface through which we enter a simpler age of bytes and bauds, when fear, uncertainty, and doubt ruled and code was king. Propelled by the pulsating synths of Trentemøller, the idea is executed. It cannot be stopped.

A discussion with Director PATRICK CLAIR and Lead Animator RAOUL MARKS.

Give us a little background on yourself, your agency Antibody and your current position at Elastic.

Patrick: Recently, I’ve been on the ground in LA working with the production team at Elastic, and its sister companies A52 and Rock Paper Scissors. Traditionally, we’ve done the production on our jobs with my team at Antibody, in Sydney. Working with Elastic is allowing us to take Antibody’s creative direction to the next level – watch for upcoming projects for Ubisoft, Playstation, Wired. 

What was your role and who worked on this…

RSS & Email Subscribers: Check out the full Halt and Catch Fire article at Art of the Title.

via Art of the Title

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On Styled Form Elements:

For almost 20 years, we’ve had the same input types and form elements we still use today: text fields and areas, password fields, select dropdowns, radio buttons, checkboxes, file fields, hidden fields, and the menagerie of button types including submit, reset, image, and plain old button.

All of these input types brought with them some styles and functions from both the operating system and browser in use. Much to our own chagrin, we (mostly) figured out how to fight that to achieve custom styles for basic and advanced elements.

Custom styling usually meant background images, pseudo-classes, weird vendor prefixes, and selectively hiding certain elements. I’m not going to get into the accessibility concerns of styling inputs with those tactics (this post can only be so long), but the complexity of input types and their implementation amplified cross-browser and platform issues. Each possible combination of browser and operating system brings its own styles and functions, some of which are hard to control, and all of which are inconsistent.

Even with that amount of stylistic complexity, the interactions of these early input types were pretty simple—click this, type into that box, check the other thing. Simplistic interaction allowed us to get a little crazy with custom styles without hurting the experience. Only the select dropdown, with its list of options, had a more advanced interaction.

As the web moved forward, though, we grew hungry for better interfaces. We built JavaScript-driven components on top of these basic input fields to achieve better experiences, and that worked fine for a while, up until everything changed when the modern mobile environment exploded in 2007.

The changing environment led to changing interactions—our adorable little calendar-like date picker was an absolute nightmare to use on a 3.5-inch touchscreen, and even dropdowns needed to be rethought.

The iPhone’s native drop-down control was a full-screen wheel-type interface, which was a much more natural interaction at its size. It’s not the perfect interface, especially when the number of options exceeds ten or so (don’t get me started on a listing of countries), but it was a big improvement over fiddling with a tiny, in-page drop-down list.

The Various Dropdown Interfaces of Apple Devices

Android’s drop-down interface was similar, but ever so slightly different—a modal listing of options which closes on selection.

Android’s Native Dropdown Interface

There was a native date picker in iOS—a three-segment drop-down interface, which was much better to use than its calendar-based predecessor.

The iOS Date picker

Standard select elements were well-supported on these new devices, but we didn’t have a way to leverage other built-in, native components, like the iOS date picker, on the web. Luckily, HTML5 came along and brought us some fantastic new input types. Types like date and range set the stage for browsers and operating systems to begin handling more and more complex interactions. Apple quickly introduced support for date in iOS 5, and gave us the ability to expose the native iOS date picker in the browser.

As support for these new input types grows, we can begin implementing them today with fallbacks when appropriate (or at least helpful hints, since unsupported input types become text fields). Dropdowns and date pickers are just a sampling of the things that are better handled by systems themselves—a device will always be able to make better decisions about its use than the device-agnostic web.

The simplistic interactions of early input types gave us room to experiment, but the more complex interactions of modern fields leave little room for that. There’s only so much we can control before the browser and operating system take over, and then we’re at their whim. The web isn’t stopping any time soon—we’re headed for more complex input types with even less control exposed.

That makes me wonder how much longer we’ll be fighting to style these elements. It’s time we stop breaking and faking input types and accept the ebb and flow of things.

via A List Apart: The Full Feed

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Where bars outnumber grocery stores:

Flowing Data created maps for other countries, too.
The more bars, the darker the brown and the more grocery stores, the darker the green. Read the rest via Boing Boing

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XKCD: the TED talk:

Here’s Randall Munroe’s TED talk about his What If? series, in which he answers big, weird questions about baseballs travelling at the speed of light and such, which is also the subject of a hotly anticipated forthcoming book. The talk is a mix of war-stories and insight into what makes Munroe (who is a fascinating dude) tick.
Read the rest

via Boing Boing

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Finalists from Pornhub's Non-Pornographic Advert Contest:

Back in March, Pornhub announced plans to run its first ever television and print ad campaign. There was one problem however, most magazines and television channels won’t allow any pornographic content. To get around this, Pornhub set up a contest for fans to submit non-pornographic ad ideas which still manage to convey the nature of the site. The person with the best ideas will get a one-year contract to be Pornhub’s creative director. A few weeks ago the company announced the 15 finalists of the competition, the best of which we’ve put below. To vote on your favourites, head over to Pornhub’s SFW Tumblr page.

Continue Reading… via HUH.

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Growing up gamer: why I gravitate to child protagonists in games - by Louie Castro:

Why I gravitate to games that have us play as children. Discussion of Child of Light, Papo and Yo, Attack of the Friday Monsters, and others. via Gamasutra.com - All Blogs

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